Category: Hacking

My repository on GitHub contains the latest version of service files described in this blog post: dropbox.service override.conf In the previous post, I explained how to organize a repository for Emacs Org Mode files. I suggested the use of a Git repository containing symbolic links to directories in Dropbox. You probably have to set up a central Git repository at somewhere in order to synchronize the repository using git push/pull.

Deft allows you to search text files in a directory quickly on Emacs. It has an optional support for recursive search, which allows you to browse through a nested directory hierarchy. This post describes how to set up a complex repository for Deft that can be synchronized across multiple machines. It also explains an idea for improving the presentation of Deft listing files from multiple directories. Overview This post mainly consists of two parts: Synchronization and Configuring Deft:

As described in my first post, I tried to use multiple accounts on GitHub. However, it appears that it was just an unnecessary complication. I have decided to use only a single GitHub account (for now) and transferred all the repositories of the new account to the old one. I will describe the process in this post. Overview My main GitHub account was akirak, which was actually created more than three years ago but had been inactive for most of the time.

I have installed Deft to my Emacs, so I will describe its most basics in this post. What is deft Deft is an Emacs major mode for quickly browsing and creating notes. It is inspired by Notational Velocity, and you can search text files matching a given text. You can use it with org-mode, but it is not limited to searching org files. You can search any types of plain text file matching extensions you configure.

I was a long user of Vim. Recently, I have started using Spacemacs. It is a community-driven distribution of Emacs, which is actually a configuration repository developed on GitHub. In this post, I will introduce some of its features and explain how I liked it. My history with text editors I started using Vim in 2011. It was six years ago. Note that I have never been a professional programmer or software developer and I didn’t have a chance to get a programming job.

I started this blog yesterday. I had always felt a need for a public space where I could share what I learn, but for some reasons, I had procrastinated it. I could finally overcome the gap, so I will describe the process in this post. One of the reasons I could not get started with blogging is tooling. As for hosting solutions, WordPress seems too complicated for my need, and Medium does not provide a way to export a whole site.

After trying to host Git repositories on a VPS, I have decided to sign up a private GitHub account for personal use. I tried Gitea first, and then its parent, Gogs. I managed to run Gogs and access its repositories via SSH, but its quality was not satisfactory. Even though the user interface of Gogs tries to mimic that of GitHub, it is poorly implemented. It raises several unnecessary warnings, and it is not responsive.

Akira Komamura