One of the issues in developing an Emacs Lisp package was configuring a test suite. You could set up a Travis CI for an Emacs Lisp project using Cask, but it was not very elegant. You had to specify dependencies both in the library header and the Cask file, which was redundant. Recently, a utility named EMake has been released. I developed a solution for running package lint before, but EMake can run package-lint, byte-compile, and ERT/buttercup tests and does not depend on Cask.

It has been long since I have published the previous post to this blog. I switched from Spacemacs to Emacs (with my own configuration) more than one month ago, and also made some changes to the theme for this blog, but didn't finish configuration for actual writing. I didn't like my previous configuration for Hugo, because I found it unnecessarily complicated after I learned a little more about Emacs. I could finally simplify my configuration for Hugo, so I will describe the new recipe in this post.

Org-Protocol

Org-protocol is an extension to Org Mode that allows you to send information to Emacs from web browsers. You can use it to save a bookmark in Org Mode, save a selected text as a note, or insert a link to the current web page. This post describes how to configure org-protocol to accomplish those tasks from Chrome. Configuring org-protocol Org-protocol is installed as part of org layer of Spacemacs, but it is not enabled by default.

Hugo and Emacs

When I started this blog, I used Typora for writing blog posts, but then I started using Emacs (Spacemacs) for both programming and writing. This blog is powered by Hugo, and you can use it by running commands on a terminal emulator, but it is not elegant. I found a recipe that integrates Hugo into Emacs, borrowed some of its ideas and code, and implemented my own solution. This blog post describes my integration.

Recently, I have upgraded the theme for this blog. Upgrading a theme for your Hugo site At first, I used git subtree to add a theme to my Hugo site, but it turned out that it would not work properly. That is, it undesirably brings all of the history of your installed theme to your Hugo site. It was my mistake. To add a theme to a Hugo site, you should just use git clone, as described in the official tutorial.

My repository on GitHub contains the latest version of service files described in this blog post: dropbox.service override.conf In the previous post, I explained how to organize a repository for Emacs Org Mode files. I suggested the use of a Git repository containing symbolic links to directories in Dropbox. You probably have to set up a central Git repository at somewhere in order to synchronize the repository using git push/pull.

Deft allows you to search text files in a directory quickly on Emacs. It has an optional support for recursive search, which allows you to browse through a nested directory hierarchy. This post describes how to set up a complex repository for Deft that can be synchronized across multiple machines. It also explains an idea for improving the presentation of Deft listing files from multiple directories. Overview This post mainly consists of two parts: Synchronization and Configuring Deft:

Akira Komamura