Tag: Emacs

It has been about one month since I have started using Pixelbook. There are several reviews on experiences about the device and Chrome OS, but I am using Emacs on the operating system, and I did not find many reviews on Chrome OS / Chromebooks from an Emacs user’s point of view. I will write a post on my actual experiences with the device and the operating system. Background Before I got the machine, I had been using a desktop computer as well as an affordable laptop computer which was manufactured by a Chinese company.

It has been long since I have published the last blog post. I promised to write about using ox-hugo but haven’t done it yet (sorry Kaushal Modi), and I also have a stack of some other procrastinated tasks in the FOSS world. There was a notable change in my life, even though I am doubtful if it is in a positive direction, but I now appear to have some spare time for following my interest.

Org-protocol is an extension to Org Mode that allows you to send information to Emacs from web browsers. You can use it to save a bookmark in Org Mode, save a selected text as a note, or insert a link to the current web page. This post describes how to configure org-protocol to accomplish those tasks from Chrome. Configuring org-protocol Org-protocol is installed as part of org layer of Spacemacs, but it is not enabled by default.

When I started this blog, I used Typora for writing blog posts, but then I started using Emacs (Spacemacs) for both programming and writing. This blog is powered by Hugo, and you can use it by running commands on a terminal emulator, but it is not elegant. I found a recipe that integrates Hugo into Emacs, borrowed some of its ideas and code, and implemented my own solution. This blog post describes my integration.

Deft allows you to search text files in a directory quickly on Emacs. It has an optional support for recursive search, which allows you to browse through a nested directory hierarchy. This post describes how to set up a complex repository for Deft that can be synchronized across multiple machines. It also explains an idea for improving the presentation of Deft listing files from multiple directories. Overview This post mainly consists of two parts: Synchronization and Configuring Deft:

I have installed Deft to my Emacs, so I will describe its most basics in this post. What is deft Deft is an Emacs major mode for quickly browsing and creating notes. It is inspired by Notational Velocity, and you can search text files matching a given text. You can use it with org-mode, but it is not limited to searching org files. You can search any types of plain text file matching extensions you configure.

Akira Komamura